Monday, April 15, 2013

Language

Language, the method of human communication, either written or spoken, is as important to a writer as having a great storyline. Over the course of months, sometimes even years, authors tediously contemplate their use of words to bring alive their stories. We don't use our language frivolously. Each word, strategically strung together, helps builds a scene, hopefully enjoyably enough that it takes the reader on a journey through to the end, and we protect those stories as we would our family. I guess that is why sometimes we take critiques so hard, and resent editors even more when they seemingly off-handedly cut out sentences, or even whole paragraphs of our precious writing. We're told we need to build up a thick skin--to not take critique so seriously. I agree. In critiquing, we can choose which  to take and which to leave, although we can learn from each. I know I have, and will continue to learn, but I hope I will never get so thick-skinned that I won't stand up for my writing when I know I'm right.

10 comments:

Margo Kelly said...

That's the trick ... figuring out when your original idea is worth keeping and when you should consider cutting or altering based on someone else's opinion.

MadelineAnn said...

So much of my book is on 'the cutting room floor' !!
I have nominated you for a "Liebster Blog Award". You can read all about this on my award post on my blog, "Reincarnated as a Writer"
Madeline xx

J.L. Schmidt said...

Good for you!

John Wiswell said...

Language is the flesh of any novel, and is crucial to my experience. I always spend more time with authors like Italo Calvino and China Mieville who have more interesting things to do with the language they employ.

John at The Bathroom Monologues

Vicki Paulus said...

Geesh, Madeline beat me too it. I have also nominated you for a Liebster Award. Thanks for the sound advice and I hope my writing progresses to the point where someone actually critiques it. My blog is http://vickipaulus.blogspot.com if you would like to accept your award!

M Pax said...

Thick skins take a long time to develop... I think. Seems to be the case for me. :) But critique is necessary.

Stephanie B said...

I'm nominating you for a Leibster award:)
http://stephcb.blogspot.com/

Sarah Chafin said...

I am still working on growing my thick skin. I agree that we still need to stand up for our work when we know we are in the right. Simply Sarah

Deb Betz said...

Keep true to yourself!

www.wearinglemon.blogspot.com

Cori Vidae said...

I think the difficult part is being able to distance yourself from your writing and recognize that people are critiquing/editing words, not you. I'm pretty good at that most times, but sometimes, with some stories, it's harder than others.

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